Understanding The FMLA

The federal government mandates that certain workers be permitted to temporarily leave their jobs when family or medical priorities emerge. Specifically, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides employees the right to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid, but job-protected, leave per year.

The intention is admirable: The FMLA is designed to enable family members to care for each other. In practice, however, the Act can be difficult to implement. It is not always clear what situations qualify for FMLA leave. Nor is it always obvious whether a worker is eligible for FMLA leave in the first place.

To minimize disruptions to their businesses, it is imperative for small business owners and other employers to understand their obligations. As the nature of those obligations is not always easy to discern, consulting with a knowledgeable lawyer can be crucial. Drawing on more than 30 years of experience in the field, The Law Firm of Peters & Wasilefski is prepared to help employers understand their duties under the FMLA, and resolve any related legal disputes that may arise.

Whom Does The FMLA Cover?

According to the Department of Labor, the FMLA covers all employees of public agencies and public and private schools, as well as most individuals who work at companies with more than 50 employees.

Leave can be taken for a limited range of scenarios, including:

  • The birth of one's child
  • The adoption of a child or taking-in of a foster child
  • To care for a family member with a serious health condition
  • To recover from a serious health condition

Are There Limitations?

To qualify for FMLA leave, employees must have worked for their company for at least 12 months, and must have logged at least 1,250 hours in that time.

There are special considerations, too, in the cases of pregnant women and members of the military service.

A Trustworthy Resource When You Have Concerns

To learn more, reach out to our firm. Based in Harrisburg, we practice throughout south central Pennsylvania. You can talk to an attorney by calling 717-260-3483 or 866-830-1116. You can also reach us online.